The USS Fitzgerald sits in dry dock in Yokosuka, Japan after a June 17 collision with a merchant vessel.
Christian Senyk / U.S. Navy

Navy Review Due Soon After Two Fatal Warship Collisions in the Pacific

Human error is likely to be among the causes of two separate collisions involving Navy destroyers. The accidents killed 17 sailors.

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Screenshot of video taken during oral arguments. Clockwise from top-left: Judge Ronald Gould, Judge Marsha Marsha Berzon, Judge George Steeh III, U.S. Attorney Sonia McNeil, and plaintiffs' attorney Marc Angelucci.
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has heard arguments about the constitutionality of a male-only draft — and whether or not a case challenging that policy should go to trial.

US Navy Photo by Johans Chavarro via Wikimedia Commons

Decades after Japanese bombs rained down on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government is still working to bury those killed in the attacks — and provide closure for those who survived. 

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter has announced that he will end all remaining barriers to women serving in any role within the armed forces.
Department of Defence photo by Glenn Fawcett via Wikimedia Commons

For more than thirty years, men have been required to register for the Selective Service. Now, there's growing sentiment that women should be included, too.

The Army hopes changes in its dining facilities will simultaneously save money, make meals more nutritious, and persuade more soldiers to eat there.

Capt. Florent Groberg with Southern California high school students.
John Ismay/KPCC

Florent Groberg is in one of the smallest clubs in the military: he's a recipient of the Medal of Honor, a distinction earned by only ten living veterans of the war in Afghanistan.

Marine veteran John Knox arranges fall produce at the Growing Veterans farm stand at the VA Hospital in Seattle.
Patricia Murphy/KUOW

As traditional veterans organizations like the American Legion and VFW lose members, younger vets are gravitating toward dozens of smaller, more specialized groups that offer a social outlet and opportunity to serve.

The VFW Hall in Hoquiam, Washington.
Joe Mabel/Wikimedia Commons

As part of the American Homefront Project's look at the history and future of America's veterans groups, reporters Jay Price and Patricia Murphy talk with host John Hockenberry on PRI's The Takeaway.

For many veterans of World War II and Vietnam, the Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion posts were popular social gathering places to share stories of war experiences. And they were powerful lobbying voices in the political sphere.

But across the nation, participation in these organizations has declined. Veterans groups are making new efforts to recruit younger members.

VFW Post 8469 in Fairfax, Va. is holding pumpkin-carvings and other events to try to become more family-friendly.
Jay Price/WUNC

The leadership of the American Legion and VFW is seeking younger, more diverse members. But they face a challenge changing their public image.


Men pose outside American Legion Post 177 in Venice, California in this undated photo. The post remains in operation today.
University of Southern California, on behalf of the USC Libraries Special Collections

Groups like the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars have served former service members for a century. But declining membership threatens to lessen their influence.


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