Patricia Murphy

Military and Veterans Reporter, KUOW - Seattle

Patricia Murphy is an award-winning reporter at KUOW Public Radio in Seattle focusing on military affairs, veterans' issues and criminal justice. She began her career at WBUR Boston in 1994 and has worked at KUOW since 2000.

Patricia's most recent series, “Less than Honorable,” investigated how the military handles more than 3,000 sexual assault cases each year. Her 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times, “The Weight of War,” looked at heavy loads carried by troops and the increase in chronic orthopedic injuries as a result; the series won a national award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Healthcare Journalists. She also received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a documentary on IV drug use and has had her work recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2012, Patricia was inducted into the Dart Society, a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice. In a briefing document accidentally sent to her by an Army public affairs officer, Patricia was described as “a professional, no-nonsense reporter who comes to the table fully prepared.”

Patricia holds a B.A. from Emerson College in Boston.

Ways to Connect

The Veterans Administration got $2.5 billion to add more doctors, nurses and other staff. An NPR investigation finds that total staff didn't rise much more than it might have without that money. We examine reasons why it's hard to bring new medical personnel into the VA, including a cumbersome hiring process.

Army Sgt. Jerssy Toscano performs a sobriety test on a suspected drunk driver at Fort Irwin, Cal. in May 2016.
Spc. Adam Parent / U.S. Army

A new study suggests fear of punishment may keep soldiers from seeking substance abuse treatment.

The VA is giving more some nurse practitioners more autonomy to treat patients, but not all of them will be free from physician oversight.


Jeff Lynch survived catastrophic injuries from his two deployments to Iraq, but they left him unable to have children naturally.
Brian Batista / American Homefront

Thousands of veterans have suffered combat injures that left them infertile. For the first time, the VA will pay for treatments to help them have children.

Transgender veterans hoping the veterans administration would cover their sex reassignment surgery were dealt a setback after the administration dropped the plan.


Army Infantry soldier Patrica King began transitioning from male to female more than a year ago.
Kara McDermott / American Homefront

New rules detail how military leaders must treat transgender service members. It's the latest step in the Pentagon's effort to integrate transgender people into the armed forces.

The Army plans to practice firing its High Mobility Artillery Rocket System this week at Joint Base Lewis-McChord despite concern from neighbors about the impact of the noise.

Much of the feedback solicited by the Army from neighbors around the base was negative. Many said noise from the unarmed rockets would be disruptive to children, animals and people with post-traumatic stress disorder.  


Veterans Bobby McGee, Michael Horsley, and David Lee Murphy Jr. were forced to find new schools when ITT Tech shut down.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

Military veterans were among the people most affected by this month's shutdown of ITT Technical Institutes. More than six-thousand former service members were enrolled at the for-profit college chain.

Three members of the Owen family - Chandler, Emily, and Joshua - take a homeschool 'field trip' to Sunnyside Beach, Wash.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

Homeschooling is becoming more common, and studies suggest that military parents are more likely to homeschool their kids.

Navy Nurse Anesthetist Christine Maclan hangs an intravenous drip while preparing the operating room for surgery. While nurse anesthetists can work independently in the military, they must work under a doctor's supervision at the V.A.
James R. Evans / U.S. Navy

The Department of Veterans Affairs wants to allow specially trained nurses to do some things that doctors do now. That might reduce wait times for patients, but some doctors say it would worsen care for veterans.

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