Sarah Harris

Based in upstate New York, Sarah Harris reports on military and veterans issues in the area around Fort Drum. She's worked in a variety of roles at North Country Public Radio,  first covering the Champlain Valley in Vermont and New York, and now covering St. Lawrence County.

Sarah's work has aired nationally on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Here & Now, and other programs. Her writing has been published in The American Prospect and Slate. She reported on cement production in Chanute, Kansas through the Middlebury Fellowship in Environmental Journalism and contributed to the award-winning NPR/Center for Public Integrity collaborative series "Poisoned Places." Sarah taught the first session of the Transom Story Workshop in fall 2011.

She lives with her partner Joe, a cat named Louie, and soon, two llamas.

Ways to Connect

Veteran John Sherer doesn't drive and relies in part on DAV transport to access medical care.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

Approximately 5 million veterans live in rural America, and almost sixty percent of them rely on VA healthcare. But accessing that care can be a challenge.

The Department of Veterans Affairs National Call Center in Canandaigua, N.Y., pictured in this 2013 photo, is one of three operated by the VA.
Department of Veterans Affairs

The VA has opened more call centers and hired hundreds of additional responders after complaints that some callers experienced long hold times or were sent to voicemail.

Aleta Nims has lived in Potsdam, N.Y. for a year. She's still working to get re-licensed as a mental health counselor.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

When military families move, the careers of service members' spouses may grind to a halt because they lack a professional license in their new state.

During an Army training exercise, Capt. Fazari Mutalib demonstrates a laser system that tests aviators' abilities to avoid detection.
Michael Strassner / U.S. Army

Under the Trump administration, the military is shifting its strategy back towards more traditional warfare.

More than sixty percent of the students at Indian River Central School in Philadelphia, New York, are from military families.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

Kids in military families average six to nine moves before they graduate high school. That means navigating new schools, finding new friends, and catching up in classes ... over and over again.

A charity called 'Homes for Our Troops' is building an accessible home for veteran Ryan Wilcox in upstate New York.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

When veterans with war injuries need accessible housing, they often have few options.

Homeless veterans and other homless people live in this encampment near the Saratoga Springs, New York train station.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

Homelessness often looks different for veterans living in rural communities: Rather than living in the streets, they may be couch-surfacing, sleeping in their cars, or camping in the woods.

Actor Stephan Wolfert directs a program called DE-CRUIT that  welcomes veterans to the stage to perform Shakespeare.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

A workshop in New York uses creative writing and Shakespearean monologues to help veterans heal.

Actors Patrick Schwarzenegger (left) and Jon Beavers crouch in position on set of "The Long Road Home."
Van Redin / National Geographic

The National Geographic mini-series depicts the true story of an ambush that killed eight Americans and hundreds of Iraqis.

Lt. Cmdr. Valerie Greenaway conducts a Navy training session in December 2016, when an Obama-era policy allowed transgender service members to serve openly. Now, President Trump has ordered a ban on transgender recruits.
Erwin Jacob V Miciano / U.S. Navy

President Trump's directive prohibits transgender people from joining the military and bans the military from paying for gender reassignment surgery. But it doesn't address what will happen to transgender people currently serving.

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