american homefront

Lt. Col. Carol Barkalow, now retired, was in the first class at West Point that included women.
Gustavo Sebran / U.S. Army

The Marine Corps photo scandal has disappointed some veterans who helped break down barriers for women in the military, but they say it shouldn't overshadow the progress of female service members.

When President Donald Trump visited a shipyard at Newport News, Va. this month, he told an audience of sailors and shipbuilders that the United States would defeat any danger and handle any threat.

But one of the biggest threats to the military is one that Trump didn't mention: sea level rise.  

Looking For Future Leaders In Technology

Mar 10, 2017

Tampa's MacDill Air Force Base put on an impressive show of skill and threw in a bit of fun for some 1200 school students who visited the base this month to check out military careers linked to science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

“Never before in our nation’s history have we depended more on technology and the application of technology to win – not only in the air – but in space and in cyber space,” said MacDill Commander Col. April Vogel. “You know our mission is to fly, fight and win. So, we need to create people who can do that. And there are some amazing young minds here today which is why this is so special.”

Major Misty Posey leads a 2016 class for Marine Corps leaders about integrating women into combat roles.
Lance Cpl. Harley Robinson / U.S. Marine Corps

Revelations that hundreds of Marines shared lewd photos of women come as military leaders fight an ongoing battle to change the culture of the Marines.

The Department of Defense has launched an investigation after the non-profit news organization The War Horse broke a story about Marines spreading nude photos of female service members online. The report says Marines used a closed Facebook page to post links to explicit photos of the women with their ranks, names, and military stations of duty.

Corrita Concon shops at the commissary at the Los Angeles Air Force Base about three times a week. She estimates she saves about 30 percent compared with local supermarkets.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

The stores offer low prices for service members and retirees. But taxpayers pay more than a billion dollars a year to subsidize them.

Sharilyn Wells knows what it's like to wait for a spouse returning from a deployment.

"Being a military brat myself, being in the Army, and being a military spouse, I know that there are a lot of hardships that military families endure," said Wells, 32.

Instagram: @sharilynwellsphoto

Sham Hasan, an Iraqi, worked with American forces as an interpreter starting in 2010. He was part of efforts to rebuild and train the Iraqi Army and, after the U.S. withdrawal of forces, continued to work for an American contractor in Baghdad.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

The interpreters, who were caught up in the Trump Administration's travel ban, aided U.S. troops during the Iraq war.

Veterans stationed at Camp Lejeune who were exposed to contaminated drinking water now have a chance to receive additional compensation.

The Obama administration will provide more than $2 billion in disability benefits to veterans assigned to Lejeune when the camp's water was tainted between August 1953 and December 1987. 

The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that up to 900,000 service members might have been exposed to the contaminated water.

Army Sgt. Jerssy Toscano performs a sobriety test on a suspected drunk driver at Fort Irwin, Cal. in May 2016.
Spc. Adam Parent / U.S. Army

A new study suggests fear of punishment may keep soldiers from seeking substance abuse treatment.

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