american homefront

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American Homefront reporter Jay Price talks with WUNC's Frank Stasio about the potential dangers of burn pits, which were commonly used to dispose of trash at U.S. bases in Afghanistan and Iraq. Price, who spent time at several of the bases as a journalist, explains that burn pits were among many things that polluted the air in war zones.

Marine Lance Cpl. Richard Carmichael disposes of trash in a burn pit in Afghanistan in this 2013 photo.
Sgt Anthony L. Ortiz / U.S. Marine Corps

So-called "burn pits" were common at U.S. military outposts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Legislation in the Senate would create a center to study the effects of breathing their smoke.

Charlotte and Albert (Bruce) Chalcraft of Inverness, FL are keepers of Leo Chalcraft's legacy.
Bobbie O'Brien / WUSF Public Media

To commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the D-Day Invasion, some American high school students are traveling to Normandy, France to make sure the victims of World War II aren't forgotten.

The northern half of Los Angeles National Cemetery in Westwood.
John Ismay / American Homefront

The V.A. is building columbariums at several veterans cemeteries, where there is no more space for traditional burials.

Marine Raiders navigate a Combat Rubber Raid Craft during a nighttime training exercise near Mobile, Alabama.
Joshua S. Higgins / U.S. Marine Corps

When it comes to the U.S. military's special operations forces, names like Navy SEALs and Army Green Berets probably come to mind. But the Marines have a unit that's not very well-known: the Raiders.

PRI's The World: Navy Allows More Tattoos

May 11, 2016
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Sophie McKibben/American Homefront

When the USS Toledo pulled into the naval base in New London, Connecticut, tattoo artist Adam Hillyer's phone started ringing.

After spending weeks at sea, there's a tradition that Navy sailors add a new tattoo to their collection.

"They do generally gravitate towards tattoos that can be done in one sitting," Hillyer said.

But not everyone; some sailors like body art that makes a bigger statement.

Since the beginning of May, tattoo enthusiasts who serve in the US Navy can ink a lot more of their bodies.

Navy Petty Officer First Class Mike Spittler already has a nautical scene tattooed on his right arm. Now, he's getting a new tattoo on his left.
Sophie McKibben / American Homefront

Beginning this month, tattoo enthusiasts who serve in the U.S. Navy can ink a lot more of their bodies. The new policy is designed to help recruit millennials, who sometimes have been turned away from military service because they have too much body art.

Homelessness in Los Angeles County rose by nearly 6 percent to 46,874 people over the past year, according to the results of a new homeless census released Wednesday morning.

Max Uriarte, who created  Terminal Lance, a web comic wildly popular among military service members, is now enjoying mainstream success with his first graphic novel.

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