american homefront

63 years after the Korean War ended, remains of U.S. service members are being identified and returned to their families -- thanks to advances in DNA technology.

Christopher Yates(left) and  Jerry Tullos, unveil a new sign commemorating the Seal Beach weapons station’s 60th anniversary in 2004.
Eleno Cortez / U.S. Navy

As the U.S. Navy pivots its resources to the West Coast in an attempt to counter Chinese ambitions in the Pacific Ocean, an increasingly relevant weapons outpost in Orange County could get a major overhaul.

Michael Bullers at his new home in El Monte, Calif. Prior to moving in, Bullers had been homeless since being kicked out the Navy for drug use in 1993.
John Ismay / American Homefront

Service members with Other-Than-Honorable discharges receive no veterans benefits and are much more likely to become homeless. But the military has no consistent standards about who gets a dreaded "OTH."

Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

Nearly 83,000 U.S. service members are still listed as missing in action from World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and other conflicts. Many of their families still hope their remains will be identified and returned home.

LaMarcus Miller (right) stars in 'Fallujah' as a young Marine who attempts suicide. Todd Strange portrays a fellow Marine who died in combat.
Keith Ian Polakoff / Long Beach Opera

One of the most intense episodes of the U.S.-Iraq conflict is the subject of a new opera premiering in Long Beach, California.

Master Sergeant Raheem Ramsey started vaping six months after he stopped smoking cigarettes.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

The Army's first ever "Health of the Force" report found that about a third of all soldiers use tobacco, and many have other health issues that affect their performance.

A federal law caps the interest rates that lenders can charge military service members, but a new report says lenders don't always follow that law.

The report released today from the U.S. Department of Education’s inspector general suggests more service members are paying too much for their loans than the government had previously revealed.

Allie and Matthew McClintock pose for a photo in Seattle. Matthew rarely allowed himself to be photographed in his uniform.
Allie McClintock

It's been more than a year since the U.S. officially ended its combat mission in Afghanistan. But American service members continue to fight -- and die -- there.

Screenshot of video taken during oral arguments. Clockwise from top-left: Judge Ronald Gould, Judge Marsha Marsha Berzon, Judge George Steeh III, U.S. Attorney Sonia McNeil, and plaintiffs' attorney Marc Angelucci.
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

A federal appeals court has allowed a lawsuit to go forward that seeks to force women to register for the military draft.

Capt. Laura Malone, a nutritionist, and Sgt. Maj. Ricky Gaines inspect the salad bar at Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma, Washington.
Christopher Gaylord / Northwest Guardian

The Army plans to reduce the number of dining facilities and improve the rest, as it tries to persuade hungry soldiers to eat in the chow hall instead of gobbling down fast food.

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