army

Lt. Colonel Eric Flake of Madigan Army Medical Center meets with Major Ruth Racine, whose 7 year old son is being treated for autism.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

The new center in Tacoma, Washington comes after years of complaints from service members that it’s nearly impossible to find autism therapy for their children.

Michael Bullers at his new home in El Monte, Calif. Prior to moving in, Bullers had been homeless since being kicked out the Navy for drug use in 1993.
John Ismay / American Homefront

Service members with Other-Than-Honorable discharges receive no veterans benefits and are much more likely to become homeless. But the military has no consistent standards about who gets a dreaded "OTH."

Master Sergeant Raheem Ramsey started vaping six months after he stopped smoking cigarettes.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

The Army's first ever "Health of the Force" report found that about a third of all soldiers use tobacco, and many have other health issues that affect their performance.

Allie and Matthew McClintock pose for a photo in Seattle. Matthew rarely allowed himself to be photographed in his uniform.
Allie McClintock

It's been more than a year since the U.S. officially ended its combat mission in Afghanistan. But American service members continue to fight -- and die -- there.

Capt. Laura Malone, a nutritionist, and Sgt. Maj. Ricky Gaines inspect the salad bar at Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma, Washington.
Christopher Gaylord / Northwest Guardian

The Army plans to reduce the number of dining facilities and improve the rest, as it tries to persuade hungry soldiers to eat in the chow hall instead of gobbling down fast food.

Drew Perine/The News Tribune

Editor's note: On Thursday, June 30, the Pentagon announced that is has lifted its ban on transgender people serving openly in the military. That's big news for Capt. Jennifer Peace whom we profiled in this story from January.

Capt. Jennifer Peace is a tall, thin woman in a crisp uniform, with minimal makeup and shiny brown hair. But when soldiers call her ma’am, she has orders to correct them.

They must call her sir.

The Army hopes changes in its dining facilities will simultaneously save money, make meals more nutritious, and persuade more soldiers to eat there.

Capt. Jennifer Peace walks into the room, a tall, thin woman in crisp uniform, with minimal makeup and trim brown hair.

But when soldiers call her ma’am, she has orders to correct them. They must call her sir.

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl faces a hearing Thursday to determine whether he’ll be court-martialed on a desertion charge.

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