Department of Veterans Affairs

Army veteran Russel Keyser shakes hands with his dog, Artemis, outside of his Ronkonkoma, NY home. Keyser says the dog helps him deal with the effects of PTSD.
Paige Pfleger / American Homefront

A growing number of veterans are acquiring service dogs to help cope with PTSD. But the VA won’t pay for them and says their effectiveness hasn’t been scientifically proven.

It was approved almost three years ago, and finally, construction could begin soon on a 120-bed VA nursing home in St. Lucie County. 

New Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities in Fayetteville, Charlotte, and elsewhere have reduced wait times. But the VA concedes it must do more.

A new administrator at the Bay Pines Healthcare System is being credited by veterans for resolving a paperwork snafu that had some low income VA clients being billed for medications they should have gotten for free.

The sunshine state was well represented at the White House Wednesday as President Trump signed a bill extending and improving the Veterans Choice Act which allows veterans to seek medical care outside the VA system under certain conditions.

Veterans seek employment at an Army Corps of Engineers career fair in Sacramento, Cal. in April 2016.
Randy Gon / U.S. Army

Racial and ethnic minorities make up an increasing share of the military, yet face added obstacles when seeking to access veterans benefits, according to a report from the Department of Veterans Affairs.

 Marine Corps veteran Bernie Lodico straightens one of the fence posts in the Veterans Garden.
Bobbie O'Brien / American Homefront

Researchers at the Department of Veterans Affairs say that raising food or animals has therapeutic value for former service members.

Dr. David Shulkin faces a Senate confirmation hearing for the position of Secretary of Veterans Affairs.
Department of Veterans Affairs

The Senate is expected to confirm Dr. David Shulkin - President Donald Trump's nominee for Secretary of Veterans Affairs. He's the only holdover from the Obama administration on the Trump cabinet. He would also be the first non-veteran to lead the VA.

The Veterans Administration got $2.5 billion to add more doctors, nurses and other staff. An NPR investigation finds that total staff didn't rise much more than it might have without that money. We examine reasons why it's hard to bring new medical personnel into the VA, including a cumbersome hiring process.

VA Secretary nominee David Shulkin tours the Cinncinati VA medical center in July 2016.
Dept. of Veterans Affairs

Some vets question whether President-elect Donald Trump's nominee for Secretary of Veterans Affairs -- a current VA Under Secretary -- will bring reforms to the agency.

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