health

Christian Wade of the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune shoots a suppressed carbine. The surpressor is the canister on the end of the barrel.
Timothy Lutz and Clarence Wimberly / U.S. Marine Corps

The Marine Corps is experimenting with suppressors and high-tech headsets to quiet some battlefield noises, while making it easier for troops to hear other sounds.

"I have grown in so many ways," said Marine Sgt. Kevin Hoffman, who suffered severe injuires from a bomb blast in Afghanistan.
Jim Greenhill / U.S. Army National Guard

The debilitating effects of post traumatic stress are well documented. But studies suggest that surviving trauma might also lead to personal growth.

Veterans stationed at Camp Lejeune who were exposed to contaminated drinking water now have a chance to receive additional compensation.

The Obama administration will provide more than $2 billion in disability benefits to veterans assigned to Lejeune when the camp's water was tainted between August 1953 and December 1987. 

The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that up to 900,000 service members might have been exposed to the contaminated water.

Army Sgt. Jerssy Toscano performs a sobriety test on a suspected drunk driver at Fort Irwin, Cal. in May 2016.
Spc. Adam Parent / U.S. Army

A new study suggests fear of punishment may keep soldiers from seeking substance abuse treatment.

Researchers Study Injections As PTSD Treatment

Dec 12, 2016
Army doctor Jeffrey Tiede prepares to administer a Stellate Ganglion Block to Sgt. Randall Kimble at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany.
Stacy Sanning / U.S. Army

A new study will test an unusual approach to treating symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder: injecting a local anesthetic into nerve tissue in the neck.

Jeff Lynch survived catastrophic injuries from his two deployments to Iraq, but they left him unable to have children naturally.
Brian Batista / American Homefront

Thousands of veterans have suffered combat injures that left them infertile. For the first time, the VA will pay for treatments to help them have children.

Marine Lance Cpl. Richard Carmichael disposes of trash in a burn pit in Afghanistan in this 2013 photo.
Sgt Anthony L. Ortiz / U.S. Marine Corps

So-called "burn pits" were common at U.S. military outposts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Legislation in the Senate would create a center to study the effects of breathing their smoke.

Master Sergeant Raheem Ramsey started vaping six months after he stopped smoking cigarettes.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

The Army's first ever "Health of the Force" report found that about a third of all soldiers use tobacco, and many have other health issues that affect their performance.

Theresa Larson, who's now a physical therapist in San Diego, struggled with eating disorders when she was in the Marines.
courtesy Theresa Larson

Thousands of service members suffer from anorexia, bulimia, or other eating disorders. At greatest risk: those who are young, female, and under combat stress.

William Kerby was exposed to repeated blasts when he was deployed to Iraq as a Marine infantryman.

“For instance, we were setting off a charge on a door or a gate to blow it open, and there’s nowhere really to go, so you basically turn away from it within a few feet,” Kerby said. “You can feel that kind of concussion, that shockwave, as it goes through your body.”