Immigration

The first Navy sailors to participate in the MAVNI program take their oath of citizenship in this 2010 file photo. MAVNI has been controversial since it began in 2008.
Scott Thornbloom / U.S. Navy

From 2009 to 2016, the Defense Department recruited more than 10,000 non-citizens into the armed forces. Now some say they're being discharged without explanation.

An Afghan interpreter (right) helps a U.S. soldier gather information from a local resident in this 2010 photo.
Corey Idleburg / U.S. Army

13,000 Afghans who helped American troops are waiting for special visas to come to the U.S. Their lives could be in danger as they wait.

Army veteran Hector Barajas stands outside the Deported Veterans House in Tijuana. The House has a database of 350 deported veterans, but Barajas estimates the numbers could be much higher.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

Hundreds of veterans - who served in the U.S. military as non-citizens - were later deported for committing civilian crimes. 

Mario Martinez, 54, an Army veteran, is facing deportation after serving four years in California state prison. While serving in the Army in the 1980s, he was deployed to Germany as part of U.S. forces sent to guard the Berlin Wall.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

Non-citizens are eligible to serve in the U.S. military. But even as veterans, they can still be deported if they commit crimes after they leave the service.