Korean War

U.S. Defense Department forensic anthropologists in Wonsan, North Korea examine the contents of boxes containing the possible remains of U.S. MIAs July 27, 2018.
David Marshall / U.S. Army

Families hope advances in DNA technology and thawing U.S./North Korean relations will help the government recover and identify long-missing remains of service members.

Families of U.S. troops who went missing during the Korean War gathered in Washington D.C. last weekend with a renewed sense of optimism

55 boxes that may contain remains of service members killed during the war were recently repatriated from North Korea, and advances in science may help experts identify who those remains belong to. Almost 8,000 U.S. troops who went missing during the Korean War are still unaccounted for.

The American Homefront Project talks with service members and veterans about who they're remembering this Memorial Day.

Veterans of the Korean War stand on the red carpet outside American Legion Post 43 in Hollywood. They gathered for the first screening in North America of the new movie 'Operation Chromite.'
John Ismay / American Homefront

In Hollywood, the Korean War is almost forgotten.  While U.S. movie studios have turned out hundreds of films about World War II and several dozen about Vietnam, movies about Korea are far less common.

63 years after the Korean War ended, remains of U.S. service members are being identified and returned to their families -- thanks to advances in DNA technology.