mental health

A bill in the California legislature would try to increase access to care for military veterans in need of complex mental health treatment.

When asked in a room full of military veterans Monday whether he'd support a more holistic approach to mental health care for vets, Donald Trump said "yes." And then he made a comment that stirred outrage on social media.

"When you talk about the mental health problems, when people come back from war and combat, they see things that maybe a lot of the folks in this room have seen many times over. And you’re strong and you can handle it," Trump told a gathering of the Retired American Warriors PAC in Herndon, Virginia.

Eric Fleming served as an infantryman in the U.S. Army. He fought in the first Gulf War, and is still suffering ill effects from combat.
John Ismay/KPCC

Eric Fleming served as an infantryman in the U.S. Army. He fought in the first Gulf War, and is still suffering ill effects from combat. John Ismay/KPCC

Starting Wednesday morning, military veterans began walking back and forth across Pasadena's scenic Colorado Street Bridge. Their goal: raise public awareness about the fact that 20 vets kill themselves in the U.S. every day.

The Colorado Street Bridge is a tragic icon - over the years, so many people have leaped from it to their deaths that it's earned the nickname "The Suicide Bridge."

Theresa Larson, who's now a physical therapist in San Diego, struggled with eating disorders when she was in the Marines.
courtesy Theresa Larson

Thousands of service members suffer from anorexia, bulimia, or other eating disorders. At greatest risk: those who are young, female, and under combat stress.