navy

When President Donald Trump visited a shipyard at Newport News, Va. this month, he told an audience of sailors and shipbuilders that the United States would defeat any danger and handle any threat.

But one of the biggest threats to the military is one that Trump didn't mention: sea level rise.  

ELIZABETH CITY — In the next few days, the last of an array of 104 wind turbines is expected to be hooked into the electrical grid, and North Carolina's largest wind farm — one of the biggest in the nation — will be complete.

Three warships are arriving at the Port of Los Angeles Tuesday and Thursday for L.A.'s first-ever "Fleet Week." Besides the usual tours, Navy officials will be talking with local officials about how the Third Fleet might help Los Angeles in the case of a huge natural disaster.

"The Navy could respond with an amphibious ship," Navy Commander Ryan Perry tells KPCC. "With an amphibious ship you have hospital beds, medical facilities. You have the ability to make water and transport it to an affected area."

PRI's The World: Navy Allows More Tattoos

May 11, 2016
D
Sophie McKibben/American Homefront

When the USS Toledo pulled into the naval base in New London, Connecticut, tattoo artist Adam Hillyer's phone started ringing.

After spending weeks at sea, there's a tradition that Navy sailors add a new tattoo to their collection.

"They do generally gravitate towards tattoos that can be done in one sitting," Hillyer said.

But not everyone; some sailors like body art that makes a bigger statement.

Since the beginning of May, tattoo enthusiasts who serve in the US Navy can ink a lot more of their bodies.

Navy Petty Officer First Class Mike Spittler already has a nautical scene tattooed on his right arm. Now, he's getting a new tattoo on his left.
Sophie McKibben / American Homefront

Beginning this month, tattoo enthusiasts who serve in the U.S. Navy can ink a lot more of their bodies. The new policy is designed to help recruit millennials, who sometimes have been turned away from military service because they have too much body art.

Christopher Yates(left) and  Jerry Tullos, unveil a new sign commemorating the Seal Beach weapons station’s 60th anniversary in 2004.
Eleno Cortez / U.S. Navy

As the U.S. Navy pivots its resources to the West Coast in an attempt to counter Chinese ambitions in the Pacific Ocean, an increasingly relevant weapons outpost in Orange County could get a major overhaul.

Michael Bullers at his new home in El Monte, Calif. Prior to moving in, Bullers had been homeless since being kicked out the Navy for drug use in 1993.
John Ismay / American Homefront

Service members with Other-Than-Honorable discharges receive no veterans benefits and are much more likely to become homeless. But the military has no consistent standards about who gets a dreaded "OTH."