veterans

Army veteran Hector Barajas stands outside the Deported Veterans House in Tijuana. The House has a database of 350 deported veterans, but Barajas estimates the numbers could be much higher.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

Hundreds of veterans - who served in the U.S. military as non-citizens - were later deported for committing civilian crimes. 

Mario Martinez, 54, an Army veteran, is facing deportation after serving four years in California state prison. While serving in the Army in the 1980s, he was deployed to Germany as part of U.S. forces sent to guard the Berlin Wall.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

Non-citizens are eligible to serve in the U.S. military. But even as veterans, they can still be deported if they commit crimes after they leave the service.

The American Homefront Project talks with service members and veterans about who they're remembering this Memorial Day.

A new administrator at the Bay Pines Healthcare System is being credited by veterans for resolving a paperwork snafu that had some low income VA clients being billed for medications they should have gotten for free.

To help her cope with her responsibilities as a fulltime caregiver to her husband Ken, Patti Katter brings home flowers for herself. Ken - an Army and Marine veteran - returned from Iraq in 2007 with severe injuries.
Bobbie O'Brien / American Homefront

When service members return from the battlefield with lifetime disabilities, their spouses often become full-time caregivers.

New research suggests that post-traumatic stress disorder among veterans can lead to increased appreciation of life and enhanced inner strength.

Air Force veteran B.J. Lange (left) leads the first improv class for veterans at Hollywood's Second City.
Dorian Merina/American Homefront

Improv comedy classes at Second City in Hollywood help veterans learn to perform, laugh, and build confidence.

Veterans seek employment at an Army Corps of Engineers career fair in Sacramento, Cal. in April 2016.
Randy Gon / U.S. Army

Racial and ethnic minorities make up an increasing share of the military, yet face added obstacles when seeking to access veterans benefits, according to a report from the Department of Veterans Affairs.

 Marine Corps veteran Bernie Lodico straightens one of the fence posts in the Veterans Garden.
Bobbie O'Brien / American Homefront

Researchers at the Department of Veterans Affairs say that raising food or animals has therapeutic value for former service members.

It’s estimated the high tech industry will create more than 200,000 "new collar” jobs in the next three years. To fill those positions, IBM is tapping into a workforce that’s already well trained - veterans.

“We need to get people to hit the ground running and be productive,” said Tampa IBM executive Stuart Bean. “And you just can’t fill them unless you have people who are already disciplined, already trained, mature enough, (and) can hit the ground running.”

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