veterans

 Marine Corps veteran Bernie Lodico straightens one of the fence posts in the Veterans Garden.
Bobbie O'Brien / American Homefront

Researchers at the Department of Veterans Affairs say that raising food or animals has therapeutic value for former service members.

It’s estimated the high tech industry will create more than 200,000 "new collar” jobs in the next three years. To fill those positions, IBM is tapping into a workforce that’s already well trained - veterans.

“We need to get people to hit the ground running and be productive,” said Tampa IBM executive Stuart Bean. “And you just can’t fill them unless you have people who are already disciplined, already trained, mature enough, (and) can hit the ground running.”

The Veterans Administration got $2.5 billion to add more doctors, nurses and other staff. An NPR investigation finds that total staff didn't rise much more than it might have without that money. We examine reasons why it's hard to bring new medical personnel into the VA, including a cumbersome hiring process.

The Potter's Lane development in Orange County, Cal. will recycle shipping containers into 16 apartments. It welcomes its first residents in February.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

A Southern California project is transforming steel shipping containers into apartments for homeless veterans. They're inexpensive, durable, and surprisingly attractive.

Jeff Lynch survived catastrophic injuries from his two deployments to Iraq, but they left him unable to have children naturally.
Brian Batista / American Homefront

Thousands of veterans have suffered combat injures that left them infertile. For the first time, the VA will pay for treatments to help them have children.

Veterans Courts Grow Quickly But Inconsistently

Nov 14, 2016
Three veterans stand before Judge Jacqueline L. Lee during their graduation ceremony from the Harnett County, N.C. Veterans Treatment Court
Jay Price / American Homefront

The number of special courts for military veterans who get in trouble with the law is increasing rapidly.

The first veterans treatment court opened eight years ago in upstate New York. Now there more than 300 of them across the country, and hundreds more are expected to open in the next few years.

Leonard Stevens is one of the last living World War II glider pilots.
Bobbie O'Brien / American Homefront

One of the last living World War II glider pilots lives in a modest home in Tampa, Florida, where he's developed a special bond with his neighbors.

Veteran Treatment Courts Help Vets Stay On Their Feet

Nov 2, 2016

More than 300 veteran treatment courts exist around the country to help former service members who have been charged with low-level crimes. The courts put veterans in counseling and rehabilitation programs for issues like post-traumatic stress disorder and substance abuse. 

Secretary of Veterans Affairs Bob McDonald testifies before a Senate committee in January 2016 on the VA's efforts to streamline the disability appeals process.
CSPAN

Veterans with denied disability claims wait an average of four to five years for appeals hearings. The VA predicts the delay will get worse if Congress doesn't streamline the process.

Cpl. Fabian Purvis is leaving the Marines, and he's looking to land a job with the San Diego Sheriff's Department.
John Ismay / American Homefront

Traditionally, the military did little for departing troops except hand them discharge papers. But in recent years, it has enacted a mandatory program to help service members prepare for civilian jobs or go back to school.

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