veterans

Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald speaks at an event at UCLA, asking landlords to offer leases to homeless veterans.
John Ismay / American Homefront

Veterans Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald was in Los Angeles with a mission: convince area landlords to rent apartments to homeless military veterans.

Ribbon cutting at VA complex
John Ismay / KPCC

The U.S. Senate has  authorized $35 million to create new housing for homeless military veterans on the Department of Veterans Affairs' campus in Westwood, California.

The V.A. Medical Center in Long Beach, Cal. is one of roughly 1700 medical facilities where veterans are being asked for DNA samples.
Kelvin Kay, Wikipedia Commons

The nation's veterans are being asked to contribute DNA for the largest genetic research project in history.

Dawn Barrett works with a veteran inquiring about housing at the Seattle Stand Down.
Patricia Murphy/American Homefront

Shortly after Barack Obama became President in 2009, he announced an ambitious goal -- to end homelessness among military veterans by the end of 2015. Now, at the deadline, results are mixed.

Jamie Jones hugs her husband, Army veteran James Wallace, as they move into their new Winston-Salem duplex apartment.
Jay Price/American Homefront

In several cities and states around the country, leaders say they've met the White House goal to end veteran homelessness.

Marine Corps veteran Clarence Moore is living in a transitional housing dorm in Los Angeles as he struggles to find a permanent home.
John Ismay/American Homefront

Los Angeles officials say they're housing more than 300 veterans a month. Still, the city's homeless veteran population continues to grow.

Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich says providing more county-funded work opportunities to veterans makes economic sense.
Andres Aguila/KPCC

The L.A. County Board of Supervisors is considering asking all vendors bidding on major county construction contracts to hire more military veterans.

Marine veteran John Knox arranges fall produce at the Growing Veterans farm stand at the VA Hospital in Seattle.
Patricia Murphy/KUOW

As traditional veterans organizations like the American Legion and VFW lose members, younger vets are gravitating toward dozens of smaller, more specialized groups that offer a social outlet and opportunity to serve.

The VFW Hall in Hoquiam, Washington.
Joe Mabel/Wikimedia Commons

As part of the American Homefront Project's look at the history and future of America's veterans groups, reporters Jay Price and Patricia Murphy talk with host John Hockenberry on PRI's The Takeaway.

For many veterans of World War II and Vietnam, the Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion posts were popular social gathering places to share stories of war experiences. And they were powerful lobbying voices in the political sphere.

But across the nation, participation in these organizations has declined. Veterans groups are making new efforts to recruit younger members.

Pages