Vietnam War

Members of the Jacksonville, N.C. Rolling Thunder chapter pass a flame during a cememony honoring prisoners of war and troops missing in action.
Jay Price / American Homefront

In the Vietnam War era, Americans became more interested in recovering missing troops -- largely because of the activism of some military families.

A San Antonio-based MAST crew loads a patient onto a medevac helicopter around 1970. The MAST program was designed to bring battlefield emergency medical techniques to civilians in the U.S.
Army Medical Department Museum

The well-equipped medevac helicopters that transported injured troops in Vietnam became the model for today's air ambulance services in the U.S.

Marines carry men wounded in a 1966 firefight in Vietnam.
Larry Burrows / Getty Images via PBS

The ten-part documentary by filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick is at times graphic, and people who work with veterans say it may trigger traumatic memories for those who fought in Vietnam.

Vietnam veterans James Lischer, left, and Bobby Lux get ready to surf at Del Mar. Since the 1960's, surfing has helped them open up about their experience in Vietnam.
Katie Schoolov / KPBS

For U.S. troops in Vietnam, the "China Beach" surfing spot provided a rare recreational outlet during the war. Some still seek healing from the waves.

Ann Holland and her daughter Carolyn Gill are still trying to learn all the details of the 1968 disappearance of Air Force Tech Sergeant Mel Holland.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

As the nation prepares to commemorate Memorial Day, more than 1600 service members remain unaccounted for from the Vietnam War. For the families of some of them, the search for answers has become a lifelong pursuit.