Soldiers at Fort Benning, Ga. use immersion troughs filled with ice and water to cool off during training in this 2018 photo.
Patrick A. Albright / U.S. Army

A New Center Is Escalating The Military's Fight Against Potentially Deadly Heat-Related Injuries

The Pentagon says reported cases of heat exhaustion jumped nearly 50 percent between 2014 and 2018.

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Mark George (right), a chaplain at the Caldwell County Jail in Lockhart, Tx., shakes hands with VA clergy training instructor Larry Collins, while attendee Vernon Cooper looks on.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

The Department of Veterans Affairs is training clergy members around the country to look for signs of psychological disorders and other issues among veterans in their congregations.

Contruction crews renovate the kitchen and dining room of a home on Fort Bragg, N.C.
U.S. Army

The $325 million dollar plan is funded by private companies and is expected to result in renovations to 16,000 homes on seven Army posts.

Members of the 52nd Fighter Wing gather at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany for a one day stand down to discuss mental health issues.
Kyle Cope / U.S. Air Force

In response to a string of suicides in the Air Force, every base is holding a one day stand down, where airmen can learn and talk about mental health issues.

Retired Drug Enforcement Administration agent Mark Coast says the agency discriminated against him and other agents because they served in the military.
Andrea Dukleth / KPBS

Federal law protects the civilian jobs of National Guard and Reserve troops when they deploy. But federal employees allege the government itself doesn't always follow the law.

A screenshot from a July 23 Facebook post shows mold on a mattress at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland. Other photos posted by airmen showed moldy shoes, walls, and uniforms.
Air Force amn/nco/snco Facebook group

Mold has long been a problem at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland in Texas. But when airmen started posting photos on Facebook, the Air Force stepped up its response.

More than 500,000 American veterans were exposed to nuclear weapons tests from the 1940s to the early 1990s. These so-called “atomic veterans” were not permitted to speak about their participation in the tests until 1996 when the Nuclear Radiation and Secrecy Agreements Laws were repealed. Now the veterans who were exposed to the radiation from the weapons program will be offered a certificate marking their contribution.

El Paso County, Col. resident Liz Rosenbaum spends about 70 dollars per month on bottled drinking water rather than drink from her tap.
Dan Boyce / American Homefront

The military is spending millions of dollars to clean up water contamination around bases throughout the country. But people living with the contamination say the money has not gone nearly far enough.

Observers watch an explosion during Operation Hardtack in 1958. 35 nuclear tests were conducted in the Pacific, exposing troops to radiation.
Nevada National Security Site

The new certificate recognizes as many as 550,000 veterans who were exposed to nuclear weapons tests between 1945 and 1992. But the certificates leave a lot of atomic veterans underwhelmed.

Army veteran Jason Gibson and his wife Kara paid out of pocket for IVF treatments that resulted in the birth of their daughter Quinn. Gibson lost both legs in an IED explosion in Afghanistan.
Paige Pfleger / American Homefront

The legislation requires the government to expand fertility coverage for service members and veterans who've suffered war-related reproductive injuries.

Black and white Marines served side by side during the Vietnam War, as seen in this 1966 photo of a firefight with the Viet Cong. But racial tension was not uncommon throughout the armed services.
U.S. Marine Corps

Camp Lejeune, N.C. was the first of several bases to experience racial violence during the Vietnam War. It led to major reforms in military racial policies.

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