Aging

Gene Popiolek, 68, (left) visits his father Bernie, 95, at an assisted living facility outside Baltimore. Bernie, a WWII veteran, pays to live here with help from the VA's Aid and Attendance benefit.
Stephanie Colombini / American Homefront

The VA Aid and Attendance benefit can help some vets and spouses pay for nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home health care. But the application process is often long and complicated.

World War II veteran Gerry Bennett, 92, plays cards with Gloria Estrello, a volunteer with the Choose Home Senior Corps program.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

The VA pilot program places federally-backed volunteers in the homes of veterans to help with cooking, cleaning and other low-skill tasks.

At a medical foster home near San Antonio, caregiver Tiffany Graves (left) sets out art supplies for Rose Witherspoon, a World War II veteran.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

For thousands of elderly veterans, long term care means living in a nursing home or institutional care setting. But some have found a much homier option.

Participants in Oxnard Family Circle's Adult Day Healthcare program get transportation to and from home on weekdays.
Libby Denkmann / American Homefront

The number of veterans in the VA healthcare system who are 70 or older is expected to grow 30 percent in the next eight years.