Coronavirus

Makayla Montz and Marc Jules Ocampo of the California National Guard medical support team prepare to work at a skilled nursing facility in Los Angeles County, Cal.
Jason Sanchez / California National Guard

As overwhelmed health departments call for help, National Guard members have been deployed to help run COVID19 testing sites and assist nursing homes.

Army recruits take their Oaths of Enlistment at Fort Lee, Va. June 22.
Patrick Buffett / U.S. Army

The Army is holding its first nationwide virtual recruiting campaign, after the COVID-19 pandemic forced it to scale back face-to-face interactions and revealed gaps in its digital outreach strategy.

Service members receive thanks from the hospital staff at Jacobi Medical Center in New York, where  they helped treat COVID-19 patients.
Xavier Navarro / U.S. Air Force

Some doctors and nurses with the Air Force Reserves are warning the public not to underestimate the continued threat posed by the coronavirus. They were among thousands of military personnel who deployed to New York City during the height of its pandemic.

Members of the California Army National Guard assemble emergency food kits at the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank.
Jason Sanchez / U.S. Air National Guard

Even as members of the Guard and Reserve are seeing longer and more frequent deployments, they don't always receive the same retirement, education, and housing benefits as active duty troops.

Maria and John Mishkind video chat with Maria's brother, Army veteran Harry Stapleton, who is a resident at the Orlando VA Community Living Center.
Stephanie Colombini / American Homefront

Like most long-term care facilities, VA nursing homes haven't allowed in-person visitation since early March.

Spc. Trent Bostic of the North Carolina National Guard examines and sorts produce at a Food Bank.
Hannah Tarkelly / U.S. Army National Guard

In some states, recruiters are reporting an uptick in the number of people who are expressing interest in joining the Guard.

Air Force retiree Berthienna Ogden uses the VA's Video Connect telehealth service as part of a 2019 VA demonstration.
Department of Veterans Affairs

Use of the Veterans Health Administration's telehealth platform has exploded during the COVID-19 pandemic. But the agency's infrastructure has struggled to keep pace.

Members of the support group Merging Vets and Players (MVP) hold an online meeting. The group says 35 percent of its members have lost jobs because of the pandemic.
Emily Elena Dugdale / American Homefront

While support groups continue to meet with members by phone or teleconference, many are overwhelmed by veterans seeking help.

Sailors have their temperatures taken as they prepare to board the USS Theodore Roosevelt May 1, 2020 after an off-ship quarantine in Guam.
Nathan Carpenter / U.S. Navy

Military recruiting and training has slowed down because of the pandemic. So the Navy is trying other ways to maintain the size of the force.

Disruptions to everyday life caused by the coronavirus pandemic are putting a strain on veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Some are seeking help virtually.

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