Coronavirus

Disruptions to everyday life caused by the coronavirus pandemic are putting a strain on veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Some are seeking help virtually.

Marine Corps veteran Travis Holt has been doing his schoolwork in a makeshift office in his spare bedroom. His internet connection at home isn't great, which can make getting online assignments done difficult.
Courtesy Travis Holt

The transition from classroom to virtual learning amid the COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for many student veterans, and the worries won't end with the spring semester.

Capt. Brett Crozier, commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, (left) washes dishes aboard the ship on Thanksgiving 2019.  Crozier was relieved of his command after urging the Navy to take stronger action to combat a COVID-19 outbreak on the ship.
D.J. Schwartz / U.S. Navy

More than two weeks after Capt. Brett Crozier was relieved of command of the aircraft carrier USS Roosevelt, friends and former shipmates are voicing their support.

Air Force cadets sit 8 feet apart from each other during their graduation ceremony in Colorado Springs, Colo. Spectators were not allowed, and cadets didn't march on stage to receive their diplomas.
U.S. Air Force Academy

Vice President Mike Pence addressed the cadets in person, but parents and others were limited to watching the ceremony online.

Sailor John Arkulary from Marshfield, Wis. salutes the flag aboard the hospital ship USNS Mercy in Los Angeles April 13.
Luke Cunningham / U.S. Navy

The Navy hospital ship Mercy is in Los Angeles to relieve the burden on the area's medical facilities. But it’s dealing with a growing number of coronavirus cases among members of its crew.

Laura White of San Diego's Support The Enlisted Project helps distribute supplies to military families who are suffering financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Nick McVicker / KPBS

Deployments, job losses, and the Pentagon's "stop movement" order are among the factors contributing to financial stress for troops and their families.

New Air Force recruits in basic training practice social distancing in their dormitory at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas.
Sarayuth Pinthong / U.S. Air Force

The coronavirus pandemic has brought big changes to one of the defining aspects of military life -- boot camp. But some people question if the changes are adequate to protect trainees.

Sailors remove the lines off the bollard as the USNS Mercy hospital ship prepares to depart Naval Base San Diego, March 23.
David Mora / U.S. Navy

The Navy has suspended some activities and restricted others to help stop the spread of COVID-19, but the military response to the pandemic can seem uneven at times.

VA staff and volunteers screen patients, employees, and visitors at the entrance to the Audie Murphy Memorial VA Hospital in San Antonio.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities are now screening patients, employees, and visitors for coronavirus. But some are questioning the agency's responce to the pandemic.

Faculty at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill undergo training March 13 to teach their classes online. The university is one of many that have discontinued in-person classes.
Jon Gardiner / UNC-Chapel Hill

The VA informed student veterans they may become ineligible for GI Bill education and housing funds if their college transitions from in-person to online classes. Congress has quickly passed a fix.

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