Department of Veterans Affairs

The Department of Veterans Affairs administers COVID-19 vaccines in a repurposed dining area at the Durham, North Carolina VA medical center.
Jay Price / American Homefront

Congress has told the Department of Veterans Affairs to offer COVID-19 vaccines to some 24 million people who don't usually get their health care through the VA.

Veteran Marc Session points to some of his Navy mementos on display in his Chula Vista, California home.
Steve Walsh / American Homefront

A VA Inspector General's report has found that the agency improperly denied benefits to thousands of veterans who couldn't see a doctor during the pandemic.

Burnout is a common problem for family members who care for disabled veterans. And for many of them, the pandemic has made things even harder.

Retired Army Colonel Herminio Blas-Irizarry volunteered for a VA COVID-19 vaccine trial. "It's something I want to do for my country," he said.
Stephanie Colombini / American Homefront

More than 50 Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers are involved in trials to test vaccines and treatments for COVID-19, and the agency is calling on vets to volunteer.

Medical personnel care for a patient in the parking garage of the  James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa. Much of the emergency department has been relocated outside.
Ed Drohan / James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital

Medical facilities run by the Department of Veterans Affairs are reopening at a slower pace than many civilian health systems. But the VA has recently started to expand in-person care.

The Department of Veterans Affairs in St. Louis is one of seeveral VA locations that have held small group sessions to help veterans deal with race and mental health.
Department of Veterans Affairs

A group of VA psychologists across the country have formed race-based stress and trauma support groups for veterans of color.

Female service members and veterans attend a Veterans Affairs Women's Health Transition Training event at Fort Carson, Col. in February. The training program now has moved online because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Neysa Canfield / U.S. Army

Women are the fastest growing subgroup among veterans. But many view the VA Health System as a place only for men.

Air Force retiree Berthienna Ogden uses the VA's Video Connect telehealth service as part of a 2019 VA demonstration.
Department of Veterans Affairs

Use of the Veterans Health Administration's telehealth platform has exploded during the COVID-19 pandemic. But the agency's infrastructure has struggled to keep pace.

Disruptions to everyday life caused by the coronavirus pandemic are putting a strain on veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Some are seeking help virtually.

VA staff and volunteers screen patients, employees, and visitors at the entrance to the Audie Murphy Memorial VA Hospital in San Antonio.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities are now screening patients, employees, and visitors for coronavirus. But some are questioning the agency's responce to the pandemic.

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