education

Marine Corps veteran Travis Holt has been doing his schoolwork in a makeshift office in his spare bedroom. His internet connection at home isn't great, which can make getting online assignments done difficult.
Courtesy Travis Holt

The transition from classroom to virtual learning amid the COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for many student veterans, and the worries won't end with the spring semester.

Faculty at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill undergo training March 13 to teach their classes online. The university is one of many that have discontinued in-person classes.
Jon Gardiner / UNC-Chapel Hill

The VA informed student veterans they may become ineligible for GI Bill education and housing funds if their college transitions from in-person to online classes. Congress has quickly passed a fix.

High school educators take part in a virtual firing range exercise as they tour Fort Carson, Col. Army leaders hope these tours will result in educators steering more students toward military service.
Dan Boyce / American Homefront

To increase interest in military service among teenagers, the Army is reaching out to some of the people who know them best: high school teachers and guidance counselors.

More than sixty percent of the students at Indian River Central School in Philadelphia, New York, are from military families.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

Kids in military families average six to nine moves before they graduate high school. That means navigating new schools, finding new friends, and catching up in classes ... over and over again.

Jeh Johnson (third from left) - then Secretary of Homeland Security - speaks at the White House Summit to Counter Violent Extremism in 2015.
Barry Bahler / Department of Homeland Security

The Department of Homeland Security will proceed with an Obama Administration grant program to counter violent extremism, but UNC-Chapel Hill  is among a handful of recipients that will be left out.

UNC-Chapel Hill is waiting for the federal government to release money awarded by the Obama Administration. Nobody is sure if it will ever come.

A specialized institution of higher learning has opened a new, permanent home at Tampa's MacDill Air Force Base.

The Joint Special Operations University, or JSOU, has been educating special forces for 16 years, but it is now housed in an airy, glass and steel-framed building with a sunny courtyard.

Tampa's MacDill Air Force Base put on an impressive show of skill and threw in a bit of fun for some 1200 school students who visited the base this month to check out military careers linked to science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

“Never before in our nation’s history have we depended more on technology and the application of technology to win – not only in the air – but in space and in cyber space,” said MacDill Commander Col. April Vogel. “You know our mission is to fly, fight and win. So, we need to create people who can do that. And there are some amazing young minds here today which is why this is so special.”

It’s estimated the high tech industry will create more than 200,000 "new collar” jobs in the next three years. To fill those positions, IBM is tapping into a workforce that’s already well trained - veterans.

“We need to get people to hit the ground running and be productive,” said Tampa IBM executive Stuart Bean. “And you just can’t fill them unless you have people who are already disciplined, already trained, mature enough, (and) can hit the ground running.”

Cpl. Fabian Purvis is leaving the Marines, and he's looking to land a job with the San Diego Sheriff's Department.
John Ismay / American Homefront

Traditionally, the military did little for departing troops except hand them discharge papers. But in recent years, it has enacted a mandatory program to help service members prepare for civilian jobs or go back to school.

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