health

Sailors remove the lines off the bollard as the USNS Mercy hospital ship prepares to depart Naval Base San Diego, March 23.
David Mora / U.S. Navy

The Navy has suspended some activities and restricted others to help stop the spread of COVID-19, but the military response to the pandemic can seem uneven at times.

From left, Gen. John DeGoes, Brig. Gen. Laura Lenderman, and Chief Master Sgt. Chris Lantagne listen to a speaker at a virtual townhall meeting at Joint Base San Antonio.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

The coronavirus pandemic is affecting every aspect of American life - including military life.

Congresswoman Jackie Speier, left, meets with Army Sergeant Richard Stayskal, center, his wife, Megan, and his attorney, Natalie Khawam, in Speier’s Washington office before an April 2019 subcommittee hearing on the Feres Doctrine.
U.S. House of Representatives

Congress has established an administrative process for service members to pursue malpractice claims. But they still can't sue in civilian court.

Air Force veteran Ronald West, 70, said he leaves his hospital room several times a day to smoke outside the Tampa VA property.
Stephanie Colombini / American Homefront

The VA has eliminated the designated smoking areas at its hospitals, clinics, and other buildings. It's a difficult transition for some patients, visitors, and VA workers.

Maureen Sevilla, Chief of the Epidemiology and Disease Control Clinic on Fort Bragg, hosts a game of 'STI Jeopardy' for a small group of soldiers. It's one way health officials are trying to make STI prevention training more relatable for young troops.
Krystle Burns / Fort Bragg Department of Public Health

Military health officials say troops are engaging in more high-risk sexual behavior, and part of the reason might be the popularity of smartphone dating apps.

Soldiers at Fort Benning, Ga. use immersion troughs filled with ice and water to cool off during training in this 2018 photo.
Patrick A. Albright / U.S. Army

The Pentagon says reported cases of heat exhaustion jumped nearly 50 percent between 2014 and 2018.

Army veteran Rosemary Salak performs exercises with physical therapist Barbara Springer as part of her participation in a study of the ReLoad app.
Paige Pfleger / American Homefront

The app uses music and audio to help amputees lessen the pain and discomfort of walking with a prosthetic leg.

Cadets at St. Mary's University Army ROTC participate in a morning workout.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

Since last year, the Army has required a fitness test before recruits start basic training.

In this 1971 Army photo, a service member is vaccinated with a jet injection gun. The Army at the time called the gun "a fast, safe method for giving mass inoculations to troops."
U.S. Army Medical Department

Some veterans say they contracted hepatitis from the "jet gun" that was used to immunize them in the Vietnam era, but researchers haven't proven that link.

Bob Krafty was just out of his teens when he was offered temporary duty at Edgewood Arsenal in 1965.
Bob Krafty

Top secret Army experiments exposed thousands of veterans to potential chemical and biological weapons. Some are still waiting for follow up medical care.

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