Immigration

Trucks line up to pass through a checkpoint at the U.S./Mexico border in Pharr, Tex. Truckers say the immigration crackdown has led to waitimes as long as six hours to cross the border.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

A thousand National Guard troops from Texas will try to address one of the unintended results of President Trump’s immigration crackdown -- traffic jams that are slowing international commerce.

Concertina wire installed by U.S. Marines remains on the beach near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in San Diego.
Steve Walsh / American Homefront

President Trump is considering sending a new round of troops to the southern border. The military withdrew some service members from the border in December, after they laid miles of concertina wire – large steel coils with razor-sharp teeth.

Marines string concertina wire at the San Ysidro pedestrian crossing.
Steve Walsh / KPBS

More than 5000 troops have been deployed to the border, mainly to build barriers to harden points of entry. Most troops are scheduled to leave the border within weeks.

A military vehicle enters an encampment in Donna, Texas, just inside the U.S. border with Mexico.
Carson Frame / American Homefront

Active-duty troops are now at the U.S. border with Mexico, two weeks after President Trump ordered the deployment in response to a large group of migrants headed north from Central America.

The first Navy sailors to participate in the MAVNI program take their oath of citizenship in this 2010 file photo. MAVNI has been controversial since it began in 2008.
Scott Thornbloom / U.S. Navy

From 2009 to 2016, the Defense Department recruited more than 10,000 non-citizens into the armed forces. Now some say they're being discharged without explanation.

An Afghan interpreter (right) helps a U.S. soldier gather information from a local resident in this 2010 photo.
Corey Idleburg / U.S. Army

13,000 Afghans who helped American troops are waiting for special visas to come to the U.S. Their lives could be in danger as they wait.

Army veteran Hector Barajas stands outside the Deported Veterans House in Tijuana. The House has a database of 350 deported veterans, but Barajas estimates the numbers could be much higher.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

Hundreds of veterans - who served in the U.S. military as non-citizens - were later deported for committing civilian crimes. 

Mario Martinez, 54, an Army veteran, is facing deportation after serving four years in California state prison. While serving in the Army in the 1980s, he was deployed to Germany as part of U.S. forces sent to guard the Berlin Wall.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

Non-citizens are eligible to serve in the U.S. military. But even as veterans, they can still be deported if they commit crimes after they leave the service.