Military families

Runners participate in an Oct. 17 domestic violence awareness event at Ft. Hood, Tex.
Kelvin Ringold / U.S. Army

The Defense Department Inspector General found that the military handles domestic violence on base inconsistently, leading to fewer prosecutions and ongoing danger for the people who are abused.

Christopher and Andrea Cacho's wedding picture was among the many possessions damaged when the Army moved them from Kentucky to Virginia.
Andrea Cacho

The Pentagon is planning to hire a single private company to oversee the moving process for military families. The current system is plagued by delays, lost shipments, theft, and a lack of accountability.

Aleta Nims has lived in Potsdam, N.Y. for a year. She's still working to get re-licensed as a mental health counselor.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

When military families move, the careers of service members' spouses may grind to a halt because they lack a professional license in their new state.

Nicole Roldan hugs her children as she returns to Tampa after a seven month deployment in Afghanistan.
Roldan family photo

The Pentagon doesn't track how many deployed service members are mothers (or fathers). But being a parent while serving the country creates unique challenges.