navy

Sailors have their temperatures taken as they prepare to board the USS Theodore Roosevelt May 1, 2020 after an off-ship quarantine in Guam.
Nathan Carpenter / U.S. Navy

Military recruiting and training has slowed down because of the pandemic. So the Navy is trying other ways to maintain the size of the force.

Capt. Brett Crozier, commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, (left) washes dishes aboard the ship on Thanksgiving 2019.  Crozier was relieved of his command after urging the Navy to take stronger action to combat a COVID-19 outbreak on the ship.
D.J. Schwartz / U.S. Navy

More than two weeks after Capt. Brett Crozier was relieved of command of the aircraft carrier USS Roosevelt, friends and former shipmates are voicing their support.

Sailor John Arkulary from Marshfield, Wis. salutes the flag aboard the hospital ship USNS Mercy in Los Angeles April 13.
Luke Cunningham / U.S. Navy

The Navy hospital ship Mercy is in Los Angeles to relieve the burden on the area's medical facilities. But it’s dealing with a growing number of coronavirus cases among members of its crew.

Sailors remove the lines off the bollard as the USNS Mercy hospital ship prepares to depart Naval Base San Diego, March 23.
David Mora / U.S. Navy

The Navy has suspended some activities and restricted others to help stop the spread of COVID-19, but the military response to the pandemic can seem uneven at times.

Commander David McKinney, a spokesman for the U.S. Naval Academy, stands alongside a sinkhole on the Severn River waterfront, where the Academy plans to build a new seawall to better withstand flooding.
Jay Price / American Homefront

The Government Accountability Office says the military isn't doing enough to deal with the effects of climate change, after more than $9 billion in hurricane and flood-related damage to three bases in less than a year.

Midshipmen from the Naval Academy depart the USS Higgins after a recent training exercise.
Steve Walsh / American Homefront

The Navy is rolling out its latest plan to manage wildlife in its ocean training grounds from Southern California to Hawaii. But environmentalists worry the Navy is backsliding in its efforts to protect marine life.

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Sailors at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla. raise a flag to recognize the station's success at retaining personnel. The Navy recognizes units that do a good job keeping sailors in the service.
Greg Mitchell / U.S. Navy

As the Navy plans to increase the number of ships, it's looking for new ways to keep sailors in the service, even allowing them to leave for a year and come back.

With a camera attached to his helmet, Navy Specialist 1st Class Benjamin Lewis participates in a training exercise. Combat Camera photographers are trained to shoot both cameras and weapons to photograph military operations.
Tyler S. Dietrich / U.S. Marine Corps

The Navy blames cost-cutting for the elimination of its two Combat Camera units, which take photos and videos of naval operations.

California has become the eighth state to legalize recreational marijuana.  But using the drug can still end a military career.

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