Jay Price

Military and Veterans Affairs Reporter, North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

Jay Price has specialized in covering the military for more than a decade.

Before joining WUNC, he was a senior reporter for the News & Observer in Raleigh, where he traveled four times each to Iraq and Afghanistan for the N&O and its parent company, McClatchy Newspapers. He spent most of 2013 as the Kabul bureau chief for McClatchy.

Price’s other assignments  included higher education, research and health care. He covered the aftermaths of Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana and Mississippi and a series of deadly storms in Haiti.

He was a fellow at the Knight Medical Evidence boot camp at MIT in 2012 and the California Endowment’s Health Journalism Fellowship at USC in 2014.

He was part of a team that was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize for its work covering the damage in the wake of Hurricane Floyd, and another team that won the Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists for a series of reports on the private security contractor Blackwater. 

He has reported from Asia, Latin America, and Europe and written free-lance stories for The Baltimore Sun, Outside magazine and Sailing World.

Price is a North Carolina native and UNC-Chapel Hill graduate. He lives with his wife and daughter in Chapel Hill.

Gen. William J. Gothard (right) receives a spent shell casing as part of his 2014 retirement ceremony at Fort Jackson, S.C.  Gothard says his 36 years of service left him with hearing loss and tinnitus.
Shantelle Campbell / U.S. Army

The settlement with earplug manufacturer 3M has focused attention on service-related hearing loss, one of the most common health problems among veterans.

Duke University graduate engineering student Matt Hawkins volunteers for a demonstration of a nasal ventilation tube during a class called "Hacking for Defense."
Jay Price / American Homefront

To keep up with potential adversaries such as China, the Pentagon is teaming with civilian technological innovators and trying to adopt some of the practices of the private sector.

Tony Sholar of the Marine Corps stands in the abandoned headquarters of a Marine unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The building was damaged in Hurricane Florence, and rainwater still pours through damaged roof.
Jay Price / American Homefront

The Marine Corps says Camp Lejeune, N.C. needs $3.6 billion in repairs, as scientists warn climate change will lead to more big storms and affect military readiness.

A VA cemetery crew lifts a steel casket from the ground containing remains of an unknown U.S. service member, more than six decades after it was buried.
Jay Price / American Homefront

Using DNA and other new technology, scientists hope to identify the remains of more than 600 U.S. service members buried in a Hawaii veterans cemetery.

U.S. Defense Department forensic anthropologists in Wonsan, North Korea examine the contents of boxes containing the possible remains of U.S. MIAs July 27, 2018.
David Marshall / U.S. Army

Families hope advances in DNA technology and thawing U.S./North Korean relations will help the government recover and identify long-missing remains of service members.

Families of U.S. troops who went missing during the Korean War gathered in Washington D.C. last weekend with a renewed sense of optimism

55 boxes that may contain remains of service members killed during the war were recently repatriated from North Korea, and advances in science may help experts identify who those remains belong to. Almost 8,000 U.S. troops who went missing during the Korean War are still unaccounted for.

From the late 1800s through the middle of the 20th century, lynchings were a widespread form of racial violence against African-Americans in the southern United States. 

A nuclear bomb and its parachute rest in a field near Goldsboro, N.C. after falling from a B-52 bomber in 1961. If it had detonated, it could have instantly killed thousands of people.
U.S. Air Force

During the Cold War, U.S. planes accidentally dropped nuclear bombs on the east coast, in Europe, and elsewhere. "Dumb luck" prevented a historic catastrophe.

Deana Martorella Orellana's mother, Laurel Martorella (left), and Orellana's sister, Robin Jewell, hold her Marine Corps photo. Orellana killed herself a year after leaving the Marines. She had agreed to undergo counseling the day she died.
Jay Price / American Homefront

Female veterans are nearly 2 1/2 times more likely than their civilian counterparts to kill themselves. Advocates say women's mental health challenges are different from those of men.

Army Maj. Jason Moncuse sat at a table in a makeshift headquarters with an Afghan actor playing the role of a commander from that nation's army. Through a Dari-speaking interpreter they traded small talk.

"Oh, and if you could, also submit this tourist visa to the U.S.," the commander said.

"Oh, so you want a tourist visa?" said Moncuse.

The chatting wasn't aimless, though. The Army is essentially weaponizing chitchat.

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