Camp Lejeune

Military and civilian officials attend a ceremonial groundbreaking at Camp Lejeune, N.C. for a major reconstruction effort that will make the base more resilient to the effects of climate change.
Jay Price / American Homefront

Hurricanes caused catastrophic damage to East Coast military bases in 2018. Now, as it starts to rebuild, the Pentagon wants to make bases less vulnerable to future storms.

Black and white Marines served side by side during the Vietnam War, as seen in this 1966 photo of a firefight with the Viet Cong. But racial tension was not uncommon throughout the armed services.
U.S. Marine Corps

Camp Lejeune, N.C. was the first of several bases to experience racial violence during the Vietnam War. It led to major reforms in military racial policies.

Tony Sholar of the Marine Corps stands in the abandoned headquarters of a Marine unit at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The building was damaged in Hurricane Florence, and rainwater still pours through damaged roof.
Jay Price / American Homefront

The Marine Corps says Camp Lejeune, N.C. needs $3.6 billion in repairs, as scientists warn climate change will lead to more big storms and affect military readiness.

Veterans stationed at Camp Lejeune who were exposed to contaminated drinking water now have a chance to receive additional compensation.

The Obama administration will provide more than $2 billion in disability benefits to veterans assigned to Lejeune when the camp's water was tainted between August 1953 and December 1987. 

The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that up to 900,000 service members might have been exposed to the contaminated water.

Marine Raiders navigate a Combat Rubber Raid Craft during a nighttime training exercise near Mobile, Alabama.
Joshua S. Higgins / U.S. Marine Corps

When it comes to the U.S. military's special operations forces, names like Navy SEALs and Army Green Berets probably come to mind. But the Marines have a unit that's not very well-known: the Raiders.