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55 Boxes Of Remains Represent New Hope For Korean Veterans’ Families

A U.S. soldier salutes during a repatriation ceremony for the remains of U.S. soldiers killed in the Korean War and collected in North Korea, at the Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018.
A U.S. soldier salutes during a repatriation ceremony for the remains of U.S. soldiers killed in the Korean War and collected in North Korea, at the Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018.

Families of U.S. troops who went missing during the Korean War gathered in Washington D.C. last weekend with a renewed sense of optimism

Frank Stasio to WUNC military reporter Jay Price about returning military remains from North Korea.

55 boxes that may contain remains of service members killed during the war were recently repatriated from North Korea, and advances in science may help experts identify who those remains belong to. Almost 8,000 U.S. troops who went missing during the Korean War are still unaccounted for.

WUNC military reporter Jay Price attended the yearly meeting between Korean War veterans’ families and government officials, and he speaks with host Frank Stasio about the story of one North Carolina woman still looking for answers about her uncle who went missing in North Korea.

Copyright 2018 North Carolina Public Radio

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