Steve Walsh

Military and Veterans Reporter, KPBS

As a military reporter, Steve Walsh delivers stories and features for TV, radio, and the web.

Before coming to KPBS, Steve worked as a journalist in Northwest Indiana and Chicago. He hosted a daily public affairs show on Lakeshore Public Radio and was an original host and producer for the storytelling project Vocalo.org at WBEZ in Chicago. He has been a reporter on Back At Base, a collaboration between NPR and seven public radio stations that looks at veterans and the military.

He is a graduate of Indiana State University. He spent a large portion of his career as a print reporter for the Times of Northwest Indiana and the Post-Tribune in Gary, Indiana. At the Post-Tribune, he was embedded in Iraq twice. He was also an investigative reporter and covered the Indiana Statehouse.

Ways to Connect

Rear Adm. Alvin Holsey (left) speaks with Ensign Dimitri Foster aboard the USS Lake Champlain in 2018. Holsey - one of the Navy's few Black admirals - heads the One Navy Task Force
Craig Z. Rodarte / U.S. Navy

The One Navy Task Force is looking at why only a handful of African Americans reach top jobs. It's also examining discrimination in all aspects of Navy life.

Navy spouse Kellie Kopec lived in an RV with her husband and seven month old daughter as they waited for a waiver that would allow them to complete their move from California to Virginia.
Andrea Dukleth / KPBS

The military issued a "stop movement" order in March in response to the pandemic. While the ban has been loosened, some service members and their families still can't relocate to new bases.

Members of the California Army National Guard assemble emergency food kits at the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank.
Jason Sanchez / U.S. Air National Guard

Even as members of the Guard and Reserve are seeing longer and more frequent deployments, they don't always receive the same retirement, education, and housing benefits as active duty troops.

Sailors have their temperatures taken as they prepare to board the USS Theodore Roosevelt May 1, 2020 after an off-ship quarantine in Guam.
Nathan Carpenter / U.S. Navy

Military recruiting and training has slowed down because of the pandemic. So the Navy is trying other ways to maintain the size of the force.

Capt. Brett Crozier, commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, (left) washes dishes aboard the ship on Thanksgiving 2019.  Crozier was relieved of his command after urging the Navy to take stronger action to combat a COVID-19 outbreak on the ship.
D.J. Schwartz / U.S. Navy

More than two weeks after Capt. Brett Crozier was relieved of command of the aircraft carrier USS Roosevelt, friends and former shipmates are voicing their support.

Laura White of San Diego's Support The Enlisted Project helps distribute supplies to military families who are suffering financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Nick McVicker / KPBS

Deployments, job losses, and the Pentagon's "stop movement" order are among the factors contributing to financial stress for troops and their families.

Sailors remove the lines off the bollard as the USNS Mercy hospital ship prepares to depart Naval Base San Diego, March 23.
David Mora / U.S. Navy

The Navy has suspended some activities and restricted others to help stop the spread of COVID-19, but the military response to the pandemic can seem uneven at times.

Veterans Jim Romero (left) and Ronnie Reyes practice yoga as part of their treatment at the VA Southern Nevada Health Care Center in Las Vegas. The newly opened center is the second inpatient gambling treatment facility in the VA system.
Steve Walsh / American Homefront

The Las Vegas center is the VA's second inpatient treatment facility for veterans, who are at higher risk of gambling addiction.

Spc. Afeez Amusan of the Texas Army National Guard, right, inspects a tractor-trailer alongside a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent at the U.S.-Mexico border in Pharr, Tex.
Jon Soucy / National Guard Bureau

National Guardsmen who respond to domestic missions - such as providing disaster assistance or working along the southern U.S. border - may not qualify for V-A benefits.

Retired Drug Enforcement Administration agent Mark Coast says the agency discriminated against him and other agents because they served in the military.
Andrea Dukleth / KPBS

Federal law protects the civilian jobs of National Guard and Reserve troops when they deploy. But federal employees allege the government itself doesn't always follow the law.

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