economy

Military retiree Scott Neil is overseeing construction of his new distillary in Florida. He decided to retire in the state in part because of its programs for veterans and retirees.
Bobbie O'Brien / American Homefront

States and cities around the country are ramping up their efforts to attract military retirees, whose presence can be good for the local economy.

The city of Goldsboro, N.C. is spending $6 million to build a new multi-sport recreation park on land owned by Seymour Johnson Air Force Base.
Goldsboro, N.C. Parks and Recreation Dept.

Though the federal government has no current plans to downsize the number of military bases, local communities aren't taking any chances.

Liza Rodewald works from home and co-founded Hire Mad Skills, a job site that places military spouses in remote jobs.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

Military families move a lot, and that makes it hard for service members’ spouses to hold steady jobs. About half of military spouses are either unemployed or underemployed – and that can take a toll on their families, their earning power, and the economy. 

Corrita Concon shops at the commissary at the Los Angeles Air Force Base about three times a week. She estimates she saves about 30 percent compared with local supermarkets.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

The stores offer low prices for service members and retirees. But taxpayers pay more than a billion dollars a year to subsidize them.

In the Army you don’t get a job, you get an MOS – a military occupational specialty.

Sergeant Madeline Warrington was a 35M human intelligence collector. That meant that while she was in Iraq and Afghanistan, she gathered information on possible enemy threats.