Liza Rodewald works from home and co-founded Hire Mad Skills, a job site that places military spouses in remote jobs.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

Career, Family, and Frequent Moves: Why Military Spouses Often Struggle to Find Work

Military families move a lot, and that makes it hard for service members’ spouses to hold steady jobs. About half of military spouses are either unemployed or underemployed – and that can take a toll on their families, their earning power, and the economy.

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 Marine Corps veteran Bernie Lodico straightens one of the fence posts in the Veterans Garden.
Bobbie O'Brien / American Homefront

Researchers at the Department of Veterans Affairs say that raising food or animals has therapeutic value for former service members.

It’s estimated the high tech industry will create more than 200,000 "new collar” jobs in the next three years. To fill those positions, IBM is tapping into a workforce that’s already well trained - veterans.

“We need to get people to hit the ground running and be productive,” said Tampa IBM executive Stuart Bean. “And you just can’t fill them unless you have people who are already disciplined, already trained, mature enough, (and) can hit the ground running.”

Sharilyn Wells knows what it's like to wait for a spouse returning from a deployment.

"Being a military brat myself, being in the Army, and being a military spouse, I know that there are a lot of hardships that military families endure," said Wells, 32.

Instagram: @sharilynwellsphoto

Sham Hasan, an Iraqi, worked with American forces as an interpreter starting in 2010. He was part of efforts to rebuild and train the Iraqi Army and, after the U.S. withdrawal of forces, continued to work for an American contractor in Baghdad.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

The interpreters, who were caught up in the Trump Administration's travel ban, aided U.S. troops during the Iraq war.

The Veterans Administration got $2.5 billion to add more doctors, nurses and other staff. An NPR investigation finds that total staff didn't rise much more than it might have without that money. We examine reasons why it's hard to bring new medical personnel into the VA, including a cumbersome hiring process.

The Potter's Lane development in Orange County, Cal. will recycle shipping containers into 16 apartments. It welcomes its first residents in February.
Dorian Merina / American Homefront

A Southern California project is transforming steel shipping containers into apartments for homeless veterans. They're inexpensive, durable, and surprisingly attractive.

Army Sgt. Jerssy Toscano performs a sobriety test on a suspected drunk driver at Fort Irwin, Cal. in May 2016.
Spc. Adam Parent / U.S. Army

A new study suggests fear of punishment may keep soldiers from seeking substance abuse treatment.

VA Secretary nominee David Shulkin tours the Cinncinati VA medical center in July 2016.
Dept. of Veterans Affairs

Some vets question whether President-elect Donald Trump's nominee for Secretary of Veterans Affairs -- a current VA Under Secretary -- will bring reforms to the agency.

The VA is giving more some nurse practitioners more autonomy to treat patients, but not all of them will be free from physician oversight.


In his Fayetteville, N.C. apartment, Sgt. Nathaniel Rivet prepares to pack his his gear for a nine-month deployment to Iraq.
Jay Price / American Homefront

More than 13,000 American troops remain deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, and units continue to cycle in and out of the two nations as part of the continuing U.S. mission.

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