Children

Staff Sgt. Melishia Francis prepares her breast pump in a lactation room at Lackland Air Force Base's Wilford Hall Medical Hospital.
Daniel J. Calderón / U.S. Air Force

Inflexible work schedules and lack of support can make it tough for new mothers in the military to keep breastfeeding their children.

More than sixty percent of the students at Indian River Central School in Philadelphia, New York, are from military families.
Sarah Harris / American Homefront

Kids in military families average six to nine moves before they graduate high school. That means navigating new schools, finding new friends, and catching up in classes ... over and over again.

Hannah Harris Green / American Homefront

A west coast group is using youth theater to tell the stories of an often forgotten group of children -- kids who grow up in military families.

Nicole Roldan hugs her children as she returns to Tampa after a seven month deployment in Afghanistan.
Roldan family photo

The Pentagon doesn't track how many deployed service members are mothers (or fathers). But being a parent while serving the country creates unique challenges.

Three members of the Owen family - Chandler, Emily, and Joshua - take a homeschool 'field trip' to Sunnyside Beach, Wash.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

Homeschooling is becoming more common, and studies suggest that military parents are more likely to homeschool their kids.

Lt. Colonel Eric Flake of Madigan Army Medical Center meets with Major Ruth Racine, whose 7 year old son is being treated for autism.
Patricia Murphy / American Homefront

The new center in Tacoma, Washington comes after years of complaints from service members that it’s nearly impossible to find autism therapy for their children.