Extremism

Chief Personnel Specialist Jennifer Johnston conducts an extremism stand down March 19 aboard the USS Gerald R. Ford. The Pentagon ordered all service branches to conduct the stand downs after the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.
Angel Thuy Jaskuloski / U.S. Navy

After the January 6 Capitol insurrection, the Pentagon ordered all service branches to discuss extremism with the troops. But observers say that's only a first step toward eliminating extremist behavior.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin talks with Army Maj. Gen. William J. Walker of District of Columbia National Guard outside the U.S. Capitol Jan. 29.
Erica Jaros / U.S. Army National Guard

Pentagon leaders were concerned about extremism in the military even before the Jan. 6 insurrection. But new Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said he wants everyone in the ranks to understand it's a priority.

Jeh Johnson (third from left) - then Secretary of Homeland Security - speaks at the White House Summit to Counter Violent Extremism in 2015.
Barry Bahler / Department of Homeland Security

The Department of Homeland Security will proceed with an Obama Administration grant program to counter violent extremism, but UNC-Chapel HillĀ  is among a handful of recipients that will be left out.

UNC-Chapel Hill is waiting for the federal government to release money awarded by the Obama Administration. Nobody is sure if it will ever come.